Opening Hours

MAIN LIBRARY:

Tuesday & Wednesday:  10- 6pm

Thursday & Friday:         10 - 7pm

Saturday & Sunday:        12 - 4pm

DEDICATED CHILDREN'S AREA:

Tuesday & Friday:            10 - 5pm

Saturday:                          12 - 4pm

Children can borrow books and DVDs during Main Library Hours.

RHYME TIME - suggested £3 per child:

  • Tuesdays at 10.30 with Cara

  • Fridays at 10.30 with Sasha

Monday & Bank Holidays : LIBRARY CLOSED

Keats Reading Group

Community Library has a lively Reading Group, which meets on the first Thursday of each month between 6-7pm in the quiet corner of the library.

Come in just before and get a cup of tea, then settle down with our friendly book enthusiasts and tell us what you think and possibly hear some alternative opinions.

  • No experience of a book group necessary. 
  • No Charge
  • No need to come regularly

Please register your interest by emailing keatsreadinggroup@gmail.com

These books are available to borrow from the library.


May 4th   All the Light We Cannot See   Anthony Doerr
Marie-Laure has been blind since the age of six. Her father builds a perfect miniature of their Paris neighbourhood so she can memorise it by touch and navigate her way home. But when the Nazis invade, they flee with a dangerous secret. Werner is a German orphan, destined to labour in the same mine that claimed his father's life, until he discovers a knack for engineering. His talent wins him a place at a brutal military academy, but his way out of obscurity is built on suffering. At the same time, far away in a walled city by the sea, an old man discovers new worlds without ever setting foot outside his home. But all around him, impending danger closes in.

June 1st Uncle Tungsten    Oliver Sachs

In Uncle Tungsten Sacks evokes, with warmth and wit, his upbringing in wartime England. He tells of the large science-steeped family who fostered his early fascination with chemistry. There follow his years at boarding school where, though unhappy, he developed the intellectual curiosity that would shape his later life. And we hear of his return to London, an emotionally bereft ten-year-old who found solace in his passion for learning. Uncle Tungsten radiates all the delight and wonder of a boy's adventures, and is an unforgettable portrait of an extraordinary young mind. 'If you did not think that gallium and iridium could move you, this superb book will change your mind' The Times 'The amalgamation of personal recollection and scientific history makes a luminous, inspiring book' Sunday Telegraph 'Uncle Tungsten is really about the raw joy of scientific understanding; what it is like to be a precocious child discovering the alchemical secrets of reality for the first time; the sheer thrill of finding intelligible patterns in nature' Guardian

July 6th The American Wife   Curtis Sittenfeld
In the year 2000, in the closest election in American history, Alice Blackwell's husband becomes president of the United States. Their time in the White House proves to be heady, tumultuous, and controversial. But it is Alice's own story - that of a kind, bookish, only child born in the 1940s Midwest who comes to inhabit a life of dizzying wealth and power - that is itself remarkable. Alice candidly describes her small-town upbringing, and the tragedy that shaped her identity; she recalls her early adulthood as a librarian, and her surprising courtship with the man who swept her off her feet; she tells of the crisis that almost ended their marriage; and she confides the privileges and difficulties of being first lady, a role that is uniquely cloistered and public, secretive and exposed. In Alice Blackwell, Curtis Sittenfeld has created her most dynamic and complex heroine yet. American Wife is not a novel about politics. It is a gorgeously written novel that weaves race, class, fate and wealth into a brilliant tapestry. It is a novel in which the unexpected becomes inevitable, and the pleasures and pain of intimacy and love are laid bare.